Dentist Peoria What Your Dentist Needs to Know
When you become a dentist’s patient, there will be several forms for you to fill out regarding your medical history. For many people, the idea of disclosing this medical history seems a little mundane. Although it may seem like there are few connections between your oral health and the rest of your medical history, there are certain conditions that are important for your dentist to know about and medications that may affect the type of care you receive. 
 
Osteoporosis- While it may seem obvious to disclose osteoporosis to your dentist since you are dealing with bone health, another reason to ensure your dentist is aware of your medications for osteoporosis is because some of these can cause jaw problems after a tooth extraction. 
 
Diabetes- Patients with a familiar history of diabetes, or who have it themselves, are at a higher risk of developing periodontal, or gum, disease. Your dentist may recommend additional cleanings annually or stress the importance of those minimum twice-yearly appointments to you. 
 
Pregnancy- If there is any chance you may be pregnant, may become pregnant, or are nursing, it is vital to disclose this to your dentist. Many dentists will want x-rays and other treatments done for you that should not be done while pregnant. Your care plan is going to be different if you are pregnant. 
 
Blood Pressure Issues- Medications that regulate blood pressure can have oral side effects such as dry mouth, tender or bleeding gums, tooth sensitivity, light sensitivity, nausea and vomiting. 
 
Not only is it important to disclose these conditions, you should also always disclose allergies, alcohol and tobacco habits, and medications for any serious conditions such as kidney, lung, heart or liver problems. Many medications will limit the amount or use of anesthesia you can receive during certain procedures, may not mix with pain killers prescribed after a procedure or cause side effects to worsen.
 
Just like your primary care physician, your medical history is safe and kept in restricted areas, sometimes under lock and key, at your Peoria dentist office. There are privacy laws in place that apple to all medical practitioners so you never have to worry about your information being disclosed to anyone that is not a part of your medical care team.